Category Archives: File

Finding Genealogical Data in the Chinese Exclusion Act Case Files Webinar

Legacy Family Tree Webinar
“Finding Genealogical Data in the Chinese Exclusion Act Case Files” – Wednesday, September 16, 2020 by Trish Hackett Nicola, CG

Chinese genealogical research is challenging. Even the names are confusing—a person could have two or three distinctly different names during his lifetime, and possibly an Americanized version. This webinar will give a brief history of the act, tell where the files are located, and how to access them. Examples of the rich genealogical information found in the files will be given—interrogations, affidavits, photographs, vital records, and more. The Act was in effect for 61 years—1882 to 1943. There are over 5 million Chinese Americans in the U.S. Many with ancestors who arrived in the United States before 1943 may have someone with a Chinese Exclusion Act case file.

The webinar is available at Legacy Family Tree

Operation: WWII Chinese American G.I.

Operation: WWII Chinese American G.I.
Webinar:  August 29th (Saturday). 1:15 pm – 3:00 pm

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) is proud to honor and remember the contributions of Chinese American WWII Veterans and join hands with the American Legion Cathay Post 384, Chinese American Citizens Alliance (C.A.C.A.), and Chinese Historical Society of America (CHSA) in being an official Commemorative Partner of the WWII Chinese American G.I. Program, an ongoing initiative that will host a series of virtual events to educate people around the world about this often forgotten and ignored generation of veterans.  The first event in this yearlong initiative is a live webinar titled Operation: WWII Chinese American G.I.
Keynote speaker:  Montgomery Hom, military historian, author, filmmaker
Panelists: Major Gen. William Chen (ret) & Connie Young Yu

Registration (seats limited so register now)

Find out more about the Chinese American Citizens Alliance and some of the veterans in the Digital Program Booklet 

Added new page: Indexes to CEA case files at NARA

Indexes to Chinese Exclusion Act case files at NARA Seattle

Chinese Exclusion Act Case Files
Chinese Exclusion Act Case Files

This page includes links to the indexes of the Chinese Exclusion Act case files at the National Archives at Seattle. It includes everything that has been indexed up to February 2019.
[Although the Seattle files have been indexed through mid-March 2020, this copy only goes through February 2019. The National Archives at Seattle is closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic. When it reopens, the indexing project will continue where we left off in March 2020 and I will post an updated version on the index.]

National Archives at Seattle Closures Updates

July 28, 2020
Added “NARA Seattle Closure Updates” page to the blog.

The National Archives at Seattle is still closed because of COVID-19.  I will let you know when it reopens.

10 July 2020
“Fate of Seattle National Archives facility still in limbo,” by Feliks Banel

The following article was posted in a local real estate newsletter recently:
“The last five months of the pandemic have thrown nearly all aspects of life into limbo, and the federal sale of Seattle’s National Archives is no exception. The sale of the city’s National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), located in Northeast Seattle, was first made public in January, and has been fraught with controversy and delays ever since.

Despite efforts by local organizations to slow the process in order to keep historic archival materials in the region, it seems likely that the sale of the property will eventually move forward, whether or not the contents of the archive find a new home in the state.

The archive itself is located on a sprawling 10 acre property — a rare find in a city as densely packed as Seattle. Specifically, NARA is nestled on the eastern edge of Hawthorne Hills, an affluent neighborhood with Seattle’s second-highest median household income and the lowest crime of any neighborhood in the city.

The property NARA sits on is also historic to the region, as the archives are housed in a World War II-era warehouse that was converted for use as an archive in the 1960s.

Despite the controversy over the sale and disbursement of the historic collection, the federal property NARA currently occupies is an attractive, high-value parcel. It will likely be slated for redevelopment as a residential area similar to the surrounding neighborhood and is anticipated to sell for multiple millions of dollars.

Whether or not the archives’ contents remain in Washington State, the potential for a large new development in one of Seattle’s most sought-after neighborhoods is likely to turn some heads. With both Magnuson Park and the Burke-Gilman trail nearby, future residences will certainly be attractive to buyers looking to invest in one of Seattle’s prime neighborhoods, complete with a storied past.”1

  1. W[REPORT] by Windermere, “SALE OF SEATTLE ARCHIVES COULD OPEN UP 10 ACRES FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT,” July [2020] Issue.

 

Connecting families to the files…

There is a new page on this website/blog, It is exciting when someone connects their family to a Chinese Exclusion Act case file and it is even more exciting when they have made a connection through the blog. Check out the new page and read about some really special finds in the files. See Connecting families to the files…

Family members and researchers found these connections to the Chinese Exclusion Act case files for Edward Artick,  Woo Gen’s Wa Chong Co. letterhead, Lou Yick Ming (in front), and Arthur Chin

 

 

 

 

Webinar on the Chinese Exclusion Act Files

“Chinese Exclusion Act Case Files: A Treasure Trove of Original Documents” 

 Webinar presented by Trish Hackett Nicola

 May 28, 2020 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

The event is an online class via Zoom

Thursday, May 28, 2020, 1 pm to 2:30 pm (PDT)

To sign up for the May 28 webinar on the on the Chinese Exclusion Act Files go to:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/online-chinese-exclusion-act-case-files-a-treasure-trove-of-original-documents-tickets-105898148212

On Zoom, free, sponsored by California Genealogical Society

Photo Jeong Kew Family
“Jeong Kew Family Portrait,” 1940, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Jeong Sing and Jeong Dong case files, Seattle Box 774, 7030/11576 & 11575.

 

Asian & Pacific Islander American Heritage Month

Asian & Pacific Islander American Heritage Month

Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month got its start as a congressional bill, inspired by Black History Month and Hispanic Heritage Week, with the mission of bringing attention to the contributions Asian and Pacific Islander Americans have made to the history and culture of the United States.

But did you know the whole thing was inspired by the work of two dedicated women? Jeanie Jew and Ruby Moy, who work on Capital Hill, spearheaded a campaign to get congressional support for their cause.

As a result of their lobbying, in June 1977 Reps. Frank Horton (NY) and Norman Y. Mineta (CA) introduced a resolution that called for the president to proclaim the first ten days of May as Asian-Pacific Heritage Week. The following month, senators Daniel Inouye (HI) and Spark Matsunaga (HI) introduced a similar bill in the Senate. Both were passed. On October 5, 1978, President Carter signed a Joint Resolution designating an annual celebration.

In 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed an extension turning it into a month-long celebration. And in 1992, the official designation of May as Asian and Pacific Islander American Heritage Month was signed into law.

Over the years we have had the honor of recognizing many Asian American and Pacific Islander American women in our list of Women’s History Honorees:

Chien-Shiung Wu, 1984
Queen Liliuokalani, 1985, 1989
Patsy Mink, 1986, 1992, 1998, 2002
Tye Leung Shulze, 1987
Jade Snow Wong, 1991
Tsuyako “Sox” Kitashima, 1995
Alice Fong Yu, 1997
Maya Lin, 1999, 2001
Yoshiko Uchida, 1999
Yuri Kochiyama, 2003
Maxine Hong Kingston, 2004
Mary Tsukamoto, 2006
Flossie Wong-Staal, 2013
Jaida Im, 2014
Tammy Duckworth, 2014
Judy Yung, 2015
Karen Narasaki, 2016
Saru Jayaraman, 2018
Mabel Ping-Hua Lee, 2020
Terry Ao Minnis, 2020
Wilhelmina Dowsett, 2020

[Courtesy of the National Women’s History Alliance 730 2nd St., PO Box 469, Santa Rosa, CA 95402]