Monthly Archives: October 2015

Quan Foy, Chinese Interpreter

Quan Foy photo 1908
Quan Foy, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Quan Foy file, Box 925, Case 7032/1398.

Quan Foy’s uniform cap says ” U.S.I. S. Interpreter” [United States Immigration Service]. He is also wearing a badge.

On 12 September 1908, Quan Foy was advised that on 8 May 1908, the Bureau of Immigration with the approval of the Department of Commerce and Labor he was granted thirty days annual leave of absence and two hundred and twenty days leave without pay to give him the opportunity to visit his former home in China. After his return he would resume his duties as Chinese Interpreter in Sumas, Washington. He left Sumas on 27 October 1908.

A letter dated 11 July 1908, stated that he would be entitled to bring his wife into the U.S. when he returned from China at the expiration of the leave provided his status remained the same.

The letter was signed by H. Edsell, Chinese Inspector in Charge at Sumas.

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Ng Fung Yuen – Application for Admission and photo

She Chew Affidavit
She Chew Affidavit, 1915, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Ng Fung Yuen file, Box 887, Case 7032/469.

Photos of Ng Fung Yuen
Ng Fung Yuen Photos, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Ng Fung Yuen file, Box 887, Case 7032/469.

In 1915 She Chew, a merchant at Tsue Chong Co., 412 8th Avenue South, Seattle, Washington, applied to have his son, Ng Fung Yuen, a student, join him in Seattle.
The application was rejected because Ng Fung Yuen did not answer the questions accurately. An appeal was filed and Ng Fung Yuen was re-examined. The testimony of additional witnesses, Ah Gow, Ng Yee Loon and Ng Soon Aim agreed with the applicant. Over 80 pages of testimony were given. The previous decision rejecting the applicant was reversed and Ng Fung Yuen was admitted.
The photos, exhibit K and G are of Ng Fung Yuen and his brothers.

Lem Chan – Chicken Oath

photo of Rooster
Chicken Oath
Lem Chan application
Lem Chan, Application for Duplicate of Certificate of Residence, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Lem Chan, Portland Box 44 , Case 1016/38.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

Lem Chan was 19 years old when he first arrived in the United States at San Francisco in 1871. Since then he was working as a cook in a restaurant in Astoria, Oregon. He was living at Me Gin John’s place when he lost his Certificate of Residence on Christmas day 1902. In 1904 he took a chicken oath to swear that his certificate was lost and destroyed by fire in Lum Lop Wy’s store.

[The rationale behind the Chicken Oath was that the Chinese were not Christians and therefore could not be believed when they swore on the Bible. Many courts in the United Sates and Canada had them swear over a freshly killed chicken.]

Gold, Martin. ”Chinese Oath Swearing,” Forbidden Citizens: Chinese Exclusion and the U.S. Congress : a Legislative History, (Alexandria, VA: TheCapitolNet, 2012), 60; digital images, (https://https://books.google.com : accessed 15 September 2015).

Can Ho (Howard Kan) – Gon Wing & Company business card

Photo of Can Ho
Can Ho Photo, Application for Reentry permit, Form 631, 1930, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle,  Can Ho (alias Howard Kan), Seattle Box 887, Case 7032/2456.
Business card for Gon Wing & Company
Gon Wing & Company business card, 1930, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Can Ho (alias Howard Kan), Seattle Box 887, Case 7032/2456.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 6 October 1930 Can Ho (alias Howard Kan), a merchant and member of Gon Wing & Company, 1307 First Avenue, Seattle, WA, filed an applicant for a re-entry permit, form 631. He was 52 years old and was born in Nam Tong Village, China. His parents were Sai Yick Kan and Leong Shee. He was married to Chun Shee who had died recently. He was originally admitted to the U.S. in 1907 and visited China in 1916, 1927 and 1930.
The Immigrant Inspector visited Gon Wing & Company and estimated the merchandise on hand was worth in excess of $3,000. He recommended that Can Ho’s application be approved.