Monthly Archives: December 2015

Han Chao-Tsung -Reentry Application

Han Chao-Tsung Box 962 7032 2342
Han Chao-Tsung Return Permit photo, 1933, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Han Chao-Tsung file, Seattle, Box 962, Case 7032/2342.

In June 1933 Han Chao-Tsung applied for a reentry permit so he could return to the United States after a one-year trip to China to visit family. He presented his Section 6 student exemption certificate issued to him in Manila, Philippine Islands in 1923. He was born on 6 June 1903 at Hwon Shui Village, Meng Tsing Honan, China and had lived in the United States continuously since his arrival in San Francisco on 11 September 1923 from Manila. He attended the University of Illinois from 1923 to 1927. In 1933 Han Chao-Tsung was working as a metallurgical research engineer for Illinois Steel Company in Chicago, Illinois.
Han Chao-Tsung was married to Elevina Pechon, a French woman, born in Lille, France. They were married on 10 April 1928 in Waukegan, Illinois and had a son, Pierre Han, born on 12 July 1929. The three of them were traveling together to China.

 

 

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Rose Yip Woo- Section 6 Traveler – Rockefeller Foundation

Rose Yip Woo box1020 7125 8_6
Photos of Mrs. S. T. Woo, Robert K. Woo and Ruth K. Woo, Precis in the case of the Traveler, 1927, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Mrs. S. T. Woo (Rose Yip) file, Seattle, Box 1020, Case 7125/8-6.

Rose Yip Woo, her husband, Shu Tai Woo, and their children Robert Kuotao, age 3 ½; and Ruth Kuochen Woo, age 1 ½ years, arrived in Seattle on 20 June 1927 on the S.S. President Madison. Rose was born on 27 May 1892 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Woo family was scheduled to stay one year but they applied to stay another year and their application was approved. Rose and the children had traveler’s exemptions and her husband had a student exemption from the Peking Union Medical College in Peking, China. Dr. Woo had a fellowship with the Rockefeller Foundation. They were residing in New York City.
Rose Yip Woo’s visit was approved and extended to 20 July 1928. More information about the length of stay for her husband, Dr. Shu Tai Woo would be found in his file.

Extra information not included in the file:
According to the Rockefeller Foundation website, https://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/about-us/our-history/:
The Rockefeller Foundation was incorporated in 1913 “to promote the well-being of mankind throughout the world.” The China Medical Board established a medical school in Shanghai in 1916 and one in Peking in 1917.
For more information go to: http://rockefeller100.org/exhibits/show/education/china-medical-board

Hundreds and hundreds of students entered the U.S. on Rockefeller Foundation grants.

Cleo Barnes & Ben J. Miller – Witnesses for Yee Jung Sam

Photo of Cleo Barnes
Photo of Cleo Barnes, 1926, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Yee Yook Poy file, Seattle, Box 1019, Case 7060/17-19.
Photo Ben J. Miller
Photo Ben J. Miller, 1926, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Yee Yook Poy file, Seattle, Box 1019, Case 7060/17-19.

It is unusual for affidavits in these files to include photos of witnesses. It is rare to see a photo of a woman included with her affidavit and it is extremely rare to have an affidavit from an African-American and have his photograph included. The affiants were swearing that they were personally acquainted with Yee Jung Sam, the father of Yee Yook Poy, the subject of this file. Yee Jung Sam had a Sec. 6 certificate as a merchant and was trying to get approval for his son to enter the U.S. as the minor son of a merchant.
Mrs. Cleo Barnes, age 40, a stenographer and saleslady, residing at 67 S. Fifth Street, Columbus, Ohio, had known Yee Jung Sam since 1924. He was a tea merchant at 148 East State Street in Columbus.
Ben J. Miller, age 30, a porter who cleaned the floors and washed the windows of the business was residing at 1400 Hawthorne Avenue, Columbus, Ohio.
Other affiants (photos not included):
Charles S. Boyd, Superintendent of the Capital City Laundry and Dry Cleaning company, residing at 75 Whitethorne Avenue, Columbus.
Thomas B. Johnson, engaged in the fish business at 116-118 S. Fourth Street, residing at 340 Northridge Road, Columbus, Ohio.
Yee Que Jock, also known as Yee San, was manager of Yee San Company.
The mercantile status of Yee San Company was investigated by Thomas Thomas, District Director, Immigration Service, Cincinnati, Ohio and found to be a bona fide mercantile establishment. Thomas was impressed by the reputable and creditable witnesses and recommended that the application be granted yet Yee Yook Pay’s was denied admission and was placed on board the S.S. President McKinley on 5 December 1927 for return to China.

Hurley Hospital, Flint Michigan – Dr. Florence Hwang, Intern

Hwang Wai Ching Florence Hurley Hospital
Photo of Hurley Hospital, Flint, Michigan, 1936, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Hwang Wai Ching Florence, Seattle, Box 994, Case 7032/3262.

Information included with the photo of the hospital for 1936 Internships: “In addition to board, room and laundry, interns are allowed $300 a year, paid $10 on the 3rd and $10 on the 18th of each month, and $60 on completion of the full twelve months rotative service.”

“Internships are open both to men and to women, divided usually 12 men and 2 women.”

Dr. Hwang Wai Ching or Dr. Florence Hwang was an intern at the University of Michigan Hospital and Hurley Hospital. In 1936 she was applying for a re-entry permit so she could visit China and return to the U.S. after her visit. Since she was no longer a student she could not use the student exemption in the Chinese Exclusion Act. A physician was not exempt from the Act.
After more than a month of wrangling with the immigration service and several letters of recommendation, Dr. Hwang Wait Ching (Florence) was issued a return permit. It was determined that she was still taking courses during her internship so she was granted a permit with student status.