Category Archives: Affidavits

Chin Shik Kuey (James) – Yakima, Washington

Chin Shik Kuey photo, age 3
“Photo of Chin Shik Kuey, Form M143,” 1940, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Chin Shik Kuey case file, Seattle Box 807, 7030/12930.

[It must have been very cold the day his photo was taken. James is wearing a big heavy coat and he doesn’t look very happy.]
[Researched by Lily Eng, Data Entry Volunteer, for the Chinese Exclusion Act files. Chin Shik Kuey is her uncle.]

Chin On 陳安 made a trip to China in November 1935 and upon his return in June 1937 he claimed his son, (James) Chin Shik Kuey, was born on 2 January 1937 at Wah Lok village, Hoy San, China.
In November 1939 Chin On swore in an affidavit that he was born in Seattle, resided in Yakima, and was in the restaurant business. He had made six trips to China since 1893. His intention was to bring his son, Chin Shik Kuey, to live with him in Yakima. The affidavit contained photos of Chin On and his son. He was seeking admission for his son with the status of son of an American citizen which would make him an American citizen in his own right under Section 1993 of the Revised Statues of the United States.

1939 Affidavit Photos of Chin On and Chin Shik Kuey,
“Affidavit Photos of Chin On and Chin Shik Kuey,” 1939, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Chin Shik Kuey case file, Seattle Box 807, 7030/12930.

At the age of three, Chin made the trip from his village to Hong Kong with his father’s Yakima business partner, Ng Mon Wai, and his wife. From there they boarded the (Empress of Asia) Princess Charlotte and arrived at the Port of Seattle on 13 April 1940. Chin was admitted three days later as the son of Chin On, a citizen. Since James was so young the interrogators only asked him his name and then quizzed his father. Chin On, marriage name Dee Bon, was 52 years old and born in Seattle. He was the cashier and buyer for the Golden Wheel Restaurant in Yakima, Washington. He had four sons with his first wife. They were Chin See Wing, married and living in Ellensburg; Chin See Chong, married and living in Yakima; Chin Fon Yung, married and attending school in Yakima; and Chin Moy On, age 11, attending school in Ellensburg. The wives and children of his three older sons were living in China. Chin On claimed the mother of Chin Shik Kuey died in 1939. Chin On planned to take his son, who he now called James, to Yakima and hire a nurse to take care of him until he was old enough to go to school.

Ng Mon Wai, marriage name See Suey, was a witness for James Chin Shik Kuey. Ng was a merchant and manager of the Golden Wheel Restaurant. He and his wife brought the boy on the ship from China to Seattle. Ng Mon Wai’s wife, Chan Yuen Mui, also testified. Her status for entering the U.S. was as the wife of a merchant. She was not interested in caring for a three-year old child and did not interact with James on their voyage to Seattle.
Chin Shik Kuey was admitted to the United States as a U. S. citizen, son of Chin On, a native. The notice of his admittance into the United States was signed on 16 April 1940 by Marie A. Proctor, District Commissioner of Immigration, Seattle District. Chin Shik Kuey’s finger prints were included in the file with this cautionary note.

cautionary note
“Form M-490,” 1940, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Chin Shik Kuey case file, Seattle Box 807, 7030/12930.

Dong Suey Heong (Rose Dong) of Sacramento

Photo of Miss Rose Dong (Dong Suey Heong)
“Dong Suey Heong (Rose Dong) statement photo,” 1936, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Dong Suey Heong file, Seattle, Box 700, Case 7030/8867.

Miss Rose Dong (Dong Suey Heong) left Sacramento, California for Canton, China in June 1936 with her American teacher, Miss Hartley. She left before her application for her Form 430, Native’s Return Certificate, was completed and approved. Her mother, Quan Shee, died in Sacramento on 15 November 1934 and her father, Dong Haw, was unable to help her with her paper work before she left. Donaldina Cameron, Special Director Chinese Case Work at Presbyterian Mission Home in San Francisco, a friend of Miss Dong’s late mother helped with the necessary forms, certificates and affidavits so Miss Dong could get back into the United States. Miss Cameron was well known on the West Coast for her work with the Chinese. She wrote letters to Mr. Raphael P. Bonham of the Seattle Immigration office and Mr. Philipps Jones of Angel Island Immigration Service. Rose Dong was only gone one month and needed to get back on time to start the autumn semester for the Junior College at Sacramento. Miss Cameron testified that Rose had three younger sisters: Ella, Laura and Evelyn, and a younger brother, Richard; that she had been friends with Rose’s mother for many years and first met Rose about five years previously.
Rose Wong’s father Dong Hoo (Dong Haw), a merchant and manager of Yick Chong Company in Sacramento swore in an affidavit that Rose Wong was his lawful blood daughter, born 24 March 1916 in Sacramento. Immigration authorities requested affidavits of supporting witnesses willing to give testimony in Rose’s behalf and a copy of her mother’s death certificate. A copy of Rose’s birth certificate is also in the file.
Rose returned through San Francisco on 19 August 1936 and was admitted six days later. She was paroled to Miss Cameron. Rose’s paper work was completed and approved with the assistance of Donaldina Cameron.

Cleo Barnes & Ben J. Miller – Witnesses for Yee Jung Sam

Photo of Cleo Barnes
Photo of Cleo Barnes, 1926, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Yee Yook Poy file, Seattle, Box 1019, Case 7060/17-19.
Photo Ben J. Miller
Photo Ben J. Miller, 1926, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Yee Yook Poy file, Seattle, Box 1019, Case 7060/17-19.

It is unusual for affidavits in these files to include photos of witnesses. It is rare to see a photo of a woman included with her affidavit and it is extremely rare to have an affidavit from an African-American and have his photograph included. The affiants were swearing that they were personally acquainted with Yee Jung Sam, the father of Yee Yook Poy, the subject of this file. Yee Jung Sam had a Sec. 6 certificate as a merchant and was trying to get approval for his son to enter the U.S. as the minor son of a merchant.
Mrs. Cleo Barnes, age 40, a stenographer and saleslady, residing at 67 S. Fifth Street, Columbus, Ohio, had known Yee Jung Sam since 1924. He was a tea merchant at 148 East State Street in Columbus.
Ben J. Miller, age 30, a porter who cleaned the floors and washed the windows of the business was residing at 1400 Hawthorne Avenue, Columbus, Ohio.
Other affiants (photos not included):
Charles S. Boyd, Superintendent of the Capital City Laundry and Dry Cleaning company, residing at 75 Whitethorne Avenue, Columbus.
Thomas B. Johnson, engaged in the fish business at 116-118 S. Fourth Street, residing at 340 Northridge Road, Columbus, Ohio.
Yee Que Jock, also known as Yee San, was manager of Yee San Company.
The mercantile status of Yee San Company was investigated by Thomas Thomas, District Director, Immigration Service, Cincinnati, Ohio and found to be a bona fide mercantile establishment. Thomas was impressed by the reputable and creditable witnesses and recommended that the application be granted yet Yee Yook Pay’s was denied admission and was placed on board the S.S. President McKinley on 5 December 1927 for return to China.

Birth Affidavits for Jock Dock Kee – John H. Myer and Mrs. N. Hanley

Photo of John H Myer
Photo of John H. Myer,1929, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Jock Foo Quong file, Seattle Box 745, Case 7030/10590.
Jock Foo Quong Mrs N Hanley 7030 10590
Photo from affidavit of Mrs. N. Hanley, 1929, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Jock Foo Quong file, Seattle Box 745, Case 7030/10590.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[Most affidavits in the Chinese Exclusion Act case files do not include photos of the affiants, especially if they are Caucasians. It is even more unusual to find a photo of a white, female affiant. Caucasians were frequently called upon to be witnesses for the Chinese because their testimony was considered more credible than a Chinese witness.]

Information from the Jock Dock Quong birth affidavit dated 25 January 1929:  Mrs. N. Hanley was 78 years old. She was a resident of Placerville, Idaho from 1881 to 1904. She became acquainted with Jock Yat Kee in the early 1880s. Jock Yat Kee owned and operated a large mercantile establishment in Placerville. By 1904 his family consisted of three boys and two girls, one of them being a son, Jock Dock Quong.

[Mrs. Hanley’s full name was Napina Hanley.]

According to John H. Myer’s affidavit he was 80 years old and had known Jock Yat Kee since 1881. Myer was present at Jock Yat Kee and Hu Shee’s wedding in 1898 in Placerville. Jock Yat Kee was the father of Jock Dock Quong who was born in 1901 in Placerville.

Jock Foo Quong and his brother Jock Dock Quong

Jock Dock Quong photo
Jock Dock Quong photo, 1929, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Jock Foo Quong file, Seattle Box 745, Case 7030/10590.

 
Jock Foo Quong was the son of Jock Yat Kee and Hu Shee. He was born about 1900 in Placerville, Idaho. He was also known as Fulton Yat Kee or Fulton Dick Kee. In 1938 he was living in Detroit, Michigan

Much of the information in this file pertains to Jock Foo Quong’s alleged brother, Jock Dock Quong. He was born on 14 June 1901 in Placerville, Idaho. There was no physician in Placerville at that time of his birth so his grandmother, Leong Shee, assisted at his birth as midwife. Jock Dock Quong did not have a birth certificate therefore when he wanted to visit to China he needed affidavits attesting to his birth in the United States.

Sworn affidavits were provided by his grandmother, Leong Shee; his father, Jock Yat Kee; and two Caucasians who knew him and his family since he was an infant: John H. Myer and Mrs. N. Hanley.

 

Photo of Leong Shee
Leong Shee

 

 
In an affidavit sworn on 4 January 1929, Leong Shee, age 83 years, stated that she emigrated to San Francisco when she was fourteen years old and that she moved to Placerville five or six years later. Jock Yat Kee married her daughter Hu Shee and they had seven children, including a son, Jock Dock Quong, born in 1901. Hu Shee died about 1911. Leong Shee took care of her grandchildren after her daughter died.

 
 

Photo of Jock Yat Kee
Photo of Jock Yat Kee,

 

 
Jock Yat Kee was about 60 years old in 1929. He emigrated to the United States in 1881. In 1898 he married Hu Shee at Placerville. This photo was attached to his 26 January 1929 birth affidavit for his son, Jock Dock Quong.

Ng Fung Yuen – Application for Admission and photo

She Chew Affidavit
She Chew Affidavit, 1915, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Ng Fung Yuen file, Box 887, Case 7032/469.

Photos of Ng Fung Yuen
Ng Fung Yuen Photos, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Ng Fung Yuen file, Box 887, Case 7032/469.

In 1915 She Chew, a merchant at Tsue Chong Co., 412 8th Avenue South, Seattle, Washington, applied to have his son, Ng Fung Yuen, a student, join him in Seattle.
The application was rejected because Ng Fung Yuen did not answer the questions accurately. An appeal was filed and Ng Fung Yuen was re-examined. The testimony of additional witnesses, Ah Gow, Ng Yee Loon and Ng Soon Aim agreed with the applicant. Over 80 pages of testimony were given. The previous decision rejecting the applicant was reversed and Ng Fung Yuen was admitted.
The photos, exhibit K and G are of Ng Fung Yuen and his brothers.

Chin Sic (Yip Sue) – translation of letter to his father

Phots of Chin Bic & Chan Mow
Chin Sic & Chan Mow photos on affidavit, 1910, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Chin Sic file, Portland, Box 11, Case 2230.

Chan Mow, a Chinese merchant in Portland, Oregon, for about twenty-one years, was requesting that his 19-year old son, Chin Sic, be allowed to come to the United States and join the family business. Chan Mow was a member of the Suey Wo firm.

Chin Sic's letter to his father
Chin Sic (Yip Sue), Translation of a Chinese letter, 1910, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Chin Sic file, Portland, Box 11, Case 2230.

This is the translation of a letter written by Chin Sic (Yip Sue is his married name) to his father on 6 March 1910. He was telling his father about the birth of his son, Wing Yum, and the expenses incurred for his “shaving feast” and “opening of a lantern.” The translator explains the meaning of the “opening of a lantern.”
He signs the letter Yip Sue.