Monthly Archives: August 2015

Seufert Bros. Co., The Dalles, Ore. Cannery Employee List, 1909

Seufert Bros employee list 1909
Seufert Bros. Co, The Dalles, Ore. , employee list, 1909, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Wong Fook file, Portland, Box 5, Case 1700.

This is a 1909 list of Seufert Brothers Cannery employees. It includes their certificate of identity numbers. They were probably all living the bunkhouse that was destroyed by a fire on 12 April 1909.

Wong Fook – Reference letter fom Seufert Bros. Company

Letterhead for Suefert Bros. Co
Seufert Bros Company letter, 1909, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Wong Fook file, Portland, Box 5, Case 1700.

This letter is from Wong Fook’s employer. Wong Fook lost his original certificate of residence about 1901 or 2. He reapplied about three years later and received a duplicate certificate. That certificate was destroyed in a fire on 12th April 1909.

In the above letter Mr. Seufert states “…and Seid Beck can tell more about them then I can, he suplys [sic] the help here.”

Seid Beck (sometimes spelled Back) was a merchant and labor broker in Portland.

Kai Chong Yeung – family photos

Lee Chan Wah photos

Photos, 1930, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Lee Chan Wah file, Box 833, Case 7031/43.

Photographs for Rev. Kai Chong Yeung and family. Rev. K. C. Yeung was the minister at The First Chinese Presbyterian Church, 225 East 31st Street, New York, New York. He applied to have his wife, Lee Chan Wah, and their four children join him in New York. Their eldest daughter, Margaret Mo-Hing stayed in China.

Rev. Kai Chong Yeung – Exempt Status

Exempt letter for Rev. K C Yeung
Exempt Status letter for Rev. Kai Chong Yeung, 1930, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Lee Chan Wah file, Box 833, Case 7031/43.

The 1924 United States immigration act specifically exempted from quota restriction professors and ministers of any religion as well as their wives and minor children.[1]

 Section 4(d) An immigrant who continuously for at least two years immediately preceding the   time of his     application for admission to the United States has been, and who seeks to enter the United States solely for the purpose of, carrying on the vocation of minister of any religious denomination, or professor of a college, academy, seminary, or university; and his wife, and his unmarried children under 18 years of age, if accompanying or following to join him[2]

[1] Roger Daniels, “Immigration,” Encyclopedia of the New American Nation, (http://www.americanforeignrelations.com/E-N/Immigration.html : accessed 14 August 2015).

[2] “Non-Quota Immigrants,” Public Laws of the Sixty-Eighth Congress of the United States. Sess. I, Chapter 190. 1924, p.155, (http://www.legisworks.org/congress/68/publaw-139.pdf : accessed 14 August 2015).

Lee Chan Wah – wife/exempt Yeung Kai Chong

Business cards for Luke S. Chan and Rev. K. H. Yeung
Business cards for Luke S. Chan and Rev. K. H. Yeung, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Lee Chan Wah file, Box 833, Case 7031/43.

In 1930 Rev. K. H. Yeung was a minister at the Chinese Presbyterian Church in New York City. His wife, Lee Chan Wah and children were applying to join him in New York

Gin Yut Ching – born at sea on SS President Jackson

Photo of Gin Yut Ching, age 15 days
Gin Yut Ching, photo, form M 143; Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Gun Yut Ching, Box 833, Case 7031/39.

Gin Yut Ching was born on 1 August 1930, 4:30 a.m. on SS President Jackson, Voyage 24-E, latitude: 42-13 N, longitude: 155-45 E. Arrived in Seattle, Wash. on 9 August 1930; address: 2245 Wentworth Ave.; certificate of identity 64172.

Birth report for Gin Yut Ching
Gin Yut Ching, birth report 1930; Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Gun Yut Ching, Box 833, Case 7031/39.

Gin Yut Ching, daughter of Gin Fook Tsue, merchant at 2245 Wentworth Ave., Chicago, Ill; mother: Pong Shee. Parents were from Sun Ning, Kwantong, China. The nurse attending the birth was Pauline Weidmann, 352 West Bertona St., Seattle, Wash.; doctor: J. H. Morrison, 1819 2nd Ave. N., Seattle, Wash.

Ng Mee Seu Bow – Possible Coaching Document

Ng Mee Seu Bow Coaching Letter
Ng Mee Seu Bow, Note in Chinese, 1939; Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Ng Mee Seu Bow, Box 796, Case 7030/12456.

Ng Mee Seu Bow, a 17-year-old student, arrived in Seattle with her mother, Wong Shee, on 6 October 1939 on the SS Princess Charlotte. They were on their way to New York City. While searching Ng Mee Seu Bow’s belongings, the matron at the immigration station found this booklet and a crumpled note written in Chinese in a wicker basket. Several packets of medicine were also in the basket. An interpreter was called to review the items. There is no comment in the file about their findings. Ng Mee Seu Bow was admitted with no further delay as a native. Her file mentions her birth certificate and  certificate of identity, #79995.