Category Archives: Cerificate of identity number

Mrs. Lai Ziang Bryant – Chinese Wife of Caucasian U.S. Citizen

Photo Lai Ziang Bryant 1919
“Photo of Mrs. Lai Ziang Bryant,” 1919, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Mrs. Lai Ziang Bryant case file, Seattle, Box 1263, 36351/2-1.

Lai Ziang was born in Hankow, Hupeh Province, China on 11 May 1897. In 1919 she was living with her mother and sister in Shanghai; her father was deceased. Her sister, Mrs. Joseph D. Jensen, was a widow with children whose Danish husband died about 1915.
On 6 February 1919 Lai Ziang married Charles Robert Snaith Bryant, a master licensed mariner, at the American Consul. He was 42 years old and she was 21. When they arrived in Seattle in April 1919 their marriage certificate was examined by Immigration officials and returned to them. It stated that Charles R. S. Bryant was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota and they were united in marriage by Rev. G. A. Fitch, a duly ordained minister of the American Presbyterian Church.
Immigration also examined Mrs. Bryant’s passport, endorsed by J. B. Sawyer, Vice Consul at Shanghai; and a Declaration of Alien About to Depart for the United States, form 228. The items were approved and returned to Mr. Bryant. Bryant was asked why he was bringing his wife to the United States. He said it was to allow her to have his company and to give her an education. In both 1916 and 1917 he was absent nine months, “and she said that was no home life.”
The witnesses for her 1919 application were Neville Craig, U.S. Court for China, and Walter H. Meyers of Seattle, Washington. Her application was approved.
Their travels between 1919 and 1927 are not mentioned in the file. In 1927 Mr. and Mrs. Bryant arrived in San Francisco from Balboa, Panama Canal Zone. Mrs. Bryant was delayed because she did not have a Certificate of Identity. Bryant complained to Immigration Services in Seattle because they were not given the proper documents when she arrived in 1919. He said they were very embarrassed because their landing was delayed until the paperwork could be verified. [The file does not say how long the delay was but it could have been hours or days.]
The Bryants left Seattle again in 1931. A letter in the file says she was identified by photographs and her Certificate of Identity No. 58341. [They made sure they had the paperwork in order this time.] There is no more information in the file after 1931.

Little Dancie Wong – crying and a little happier

 

Little Dancie Wong 1932 & 1937
Photo of Little Dancie Wong, form 430, 1933; Photo of Little Dance Wong, Certificate of Identity Application, 1937, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Little Dancie Wong file, Seattle, Box 742, Case 7030/10486.

Little Dancie Wong was not a happy baby when she had her photo taken in 1933. She was 2 years old, 2 feet, 8-1/2 inches tall. This photo was taken when Little Dancie and her mother and brothers, Pershing and Kellogg, were applying to leave the U.S. for a trip to China.
The 1937 photo was taken when Little Dancie and her family returned from China and were headed back to Rosedale, Mississippi. She was now six years old and 3 feet 6 inches tall. They arrived on the S.S. President McKinley on 10 November 1937 in Seattle, Washington. This photo was on her Certificate of Identity number 75531.

Information not included in the file:
According to FindAGrave.com, Little Dancie Wong died on 24 February 1951 and is buried in Beulah Cemetery, Bolivar County, Mississippi.  If anyone knows more details about Little Dancie, please let us know. See the Contact Form.

Seufert Bros. Co., The Dalles, Ore. Cannery Employee List, 1909

Seufert Bros employee list 1909
Seufert Bros. Co, The Dalles, Ore. , employee list, 1909, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Wong Fook file, Portland, Box 5, Case 1700.

This is a 1909 list of Seufert Brothers Cannery employees. It includes their certificate of identity numbers. They were probably all living the bunkhouse that was destroyed by a fire on 12 April 1909.