Summary of Information on Closure of the National Archives at Seattle

Hao-Jan Chang, left, Trish Hackett Nicola and Lily Eng look at a temporary passport from 1912 at the National Archives at Seattle Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018. (Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times)

This is a summary of information on the closure of the National Archives at Seattle

https://www.sos.wa.gov/archives/nara-seattle-closure.aspx?fbclid=IwAR0-DOFq4HyIAuN9OL80PKXHCsipjpbeoqOlf32KkhhWwPtd6L3L8D0MubA

This has been a stressful time for the National Archives at Seattle employees, the volunteers, researchers, genealogists, historians, and anyone who respects and values preserving history.

In the next week or so I will write more about what this means for the users of Chinese Exclusion Act case files and give you more ideas about where to write or call to express your views.

We just got two more volunteers to work on indexing the Exclusion files–we now have seven volunteers but it would probably take about 100 to finish indexing before the records at boxed up and shipped away.

I will start making regular blog postings soon.
Trish

Trish Hackett Nicola
CEA Blog Editor

7 thoughts on “Summary of Information on Closure of the National Archives at Seattle

  1. Thanks for keeping us posted. We have been writing letters and bring it up to our Senator in a town hall. We have used information from the Chinese Exclusion Act case files for presentations, a museum exhibit, public exhibit at our historic building, and shared them with students writing masters theses and dissertations, etc. etc.

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  2. Although I live in California, I am interested in the access to the files at the National Archives and wish to receive information about the attorney general’s decision. Thank you for the invaluable help to my brother Ben Low in researching our father’s immigration journey.

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    1. Thank you for your concern. Because of COVID-19 the outcome of the closure of the National Archives is up in the air. See https://mynorthwest.com/1784267/ferguson-national-archives-closure-compromise/ One possible location mentioned in Ferguson’s March 5 letter is Olympia, where the Washington State Archives are housed, and where current plans call for renovation and expansion of the state facility.
      If I receive any more information, I will post it on the blog.

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