Tag Archives: Leong Shee

Chin You – Manager of Royal Restaurant, 9th & Pennsylvania Ave, Washington, D.C.

Chin You restaurant ad
“Ad for Royal Restaurant” 1921, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Chin You case file, Seattle Box 799,file 7030/12562.

Chin You’s file covers the years 1906 to 1940 and has several photos of him at various ages. He lived in Washington, D.C.

Additional information 12/10/2018:

Chin You 1906 to 1940



“Affidavit photos for Chin You and Chin Jin, 1906; #5359 Chin You photo, 1911; Form 430 photo, 1921; Form 430 photo, 1940”, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Chin You case file, Seattle Box 799,file 7030/12562.

Chin You 陳耀  was born on 3 January 1885 on a fruit farm in San Jose, California and went to China with his parents, Chin Jin 陳真 and Goon She, and his younger brother, Chin Guey, when he was six years old. They lived in Ai Wan Village in the Sun Ning District. Chin You returned when he was 21 years old. He arrived in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada from China and after making his way across Canada to Montreal he was admitted to the United States at the Port of Richford, Vermont on 24 November 1906. He was held in detention for four or five days but was admitted after his father Chin Jin who worked at Quong Ying Tung Co in Boston, Massachusetts, swore in an affidavit that Chin You was his son.
Chin You made several trips to China between 1906 and 1940. This is some of the information garnered from his interrogations: His marriage name was Chin Kun Char. His father, whose marriage name was Chin See Thun, came back to the United States about 1897 and died in Boston in 1908. His brother came to the United States a couple of months after their father died.
Chin You married Yee Shee and they had a son, Chin Doon, born in 1912 in China. Chin You registered for the draft on 12 September 1918 in Patterson, New Jersey. The war ended the day after he received his draft card in the mail. Yee Shee died and Chin You remarried Lillian Lerner in 1920 in Baltimore, Maryland.
In 1921 communications from A. R. Archibald the Immigrant Inspector in Baltimore to the Commissioner of Immigration stated that they received an anonymous, rambling letter saying that Chin You was manager of the Royal Restaurant and that he was a bigamist and a draft evader. They investigated, discounted the charges and recommended that Chin You’s application be approved.
Chin You left for China in 1921 and returned in November 1939. On his immigration form he states that his first wife died and the whereabouts of his second wife are unknown. He married again in China to Leong Shee and they had six children, five sons and one daughter. He applied to leave from San Francisco for China in January 1941. His file was approved but there is no further information in the file.

Ho Shee (Ho Sue-Young) – Bonneville, WA

“Ho Shee (Ho Sue-Young), Precis of Investigation, 1940“
“Ho Shee (Ho Sue-Young), Photo, Precis of Investigation, 1940“ Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Ho Shee case file, Seattle Box 1015, 7033/251.

Page 2 photos: Mon, 36, Sun-You (Johnny), 6, Fay-lun, 7, and another of Ho Shee

This week’s blog entry is by Darby Li Po Price. He researched his family in the Chinese Exclusion Act case files at the National Archives-Seattle and found many family files. This file is for his grandmother and her family.

Ho Shee (Ho Sue-Young)’s Precis of Investigation, issued in 1940 by the American Consulate in Hong Kong, permitted Ho to travel to Seattle with two children to reside with her husband Chin Mon in Bonneville, WA.

Ho’s Seattle file no. 7033/251 also includes Mon’s petition for Ho’s immigration visa, a Pre-Investigation of status of citizenship interview of Mon, interviews of Ho, Mon, Sun-You, and Fay-lun conducted in Seattle, Summary for admission, and Ho’s application for Certificate of Identity.

Interviews spanning 22 pages describe Ho, Mon, and other family in China and the U.S. Their marriage in Sun Wui Village (Xinhui) was arranged by their parents and a go-between woman in 1922. Ho and Mon did not meet until their marriage ceremony 1 June 1 1922. A few months later, Mon immigrated to North Bonneville, WA and became owner and operator of the Kong Chew Restaurant. Ho lived with Mon’s mother in China the next 16 years. Mon returned to Sun Wui November 1928-April 1930, and April 1932-May 1934, and bought a brick house at 32 Ng Ming Chung highway for Ho. Ho, Sun-You, and Fay-lun lived in Hong Kong from 1938 until their 1940 immigration. When they left Hong Kong, Japanese planes strafed their ship and they had to duck for cover. Sun-You (Johnny) was adopted by his godfather, Jack Lee, in Portland.

Ho was born 28 December 1904 in Sun Wui to her mother Lum Shee, and father Ho Hon Jone. Ho spoke the See Yip (Siyi) dialect of Sun Wui. Mon, despite growing up in Sun Wui, spoke Yip Wui Ping dialect because in the U.S. he had mixed with Hoi San and Hoi Ping speakers.

Mon, born 28 February 1904 in Sun Wui, lived with his mother, Tom (Hom) Shee, born 1880 Sun Wui, until entry to Seattle 1922 as the oldest son of Chin Jan (Yock Kong), a citizen by 1881 birth in Portland. In 1939, Jan was a cook at the New Cathay Cafe at 82nd and Division. Mon’s mother was Hom (Mock) Shee. Jan’s parents were Chew (Joe) Chin, and Leong Shee. Mon’s siblings were: Soon, On, Quay, Wing, Hoe, and Kin. Jan’s brothers were: Quong, Jip, Choe, Hoy, Hom; sisters: Sing Choy, and Lin Choy.

Ho and Mon claimed two other sons: Gok Hing (George), born 1923, entered Seattle 1934 with Mon, then lived with Wong On, owner of the Hung Far Low Restaurant, 112 NW 4th Ave., Portland. Gok Hing (George)’s mother (whom stayed in China) was the sister of Wong On’s first wife Yee Shee. Gim Foon (Kim), was born 1929 in Ark Hing Lai, Kwangting by Mon’s first wife, whom Mon left after an affair with and impregnating her younger sister, Ho. Gim was in the care of Mon’s cousin Chin Gong (Young Yuke Jee) owner of the Kwong Ching Chong store, Hong Kong until 1941, when due to Japanese invasion he was sent to Gow How, Hoy (Hoi) Ping District to reside with a friend until returning to Hong Kong 1948. He entered Seattle in 1951.

Ho Shee’s application for Certificate of Identity
Ho Shee’s application for Certificate of Identity

Jock Foo Quong and his brother Jock Dock Quong

Jock Dock Quong photo
Jock Dock Quong photo, 1929, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Jock Foo Quong file, Seattle Box 745, Case 7030/10590.

 
Jock Foo Quong was the son of Jock Yat Kee and Hu Shee. He was born about 1900 in Placerville, Idaho. He was also known as Fulton Yat Kee or Fulton Dick Kee. In 1938 he was living in Detroit, Michigan

Much of the information in this file pertains to Jock Foo Quong’s alleged brother, Jock Dock Quong. He was born on 14 June 1901 in Placerville, Idaho. There was no physician in Placerville at that time of his birth so his grandmother, Leong Shee, assisted at his birth as midwife. Jock Dock Quong did not have a birth certificate therefore when he wanted to visit to China he needed affidavits attesting to his birth in the United States.

Sworn affidavits were provided by his grandmother, Leong Shee; his father, Jock Yat Kee; and two Caucasians who knew him and his family since he was an infant: John H. Myer and Mrs. N. Hanley.

 

Photo of Leong Shee
Leong Shee

 

 
In an affidavit sworn on 4 January 1929, Leong Shee, age 83 years, stated that she emigrated to San Francisco when she was fourteen years old and that she moved to Placerville five or six years later. Jock Yat Kee married her daughter Hu Shee and they had seven children, including a son, Jock Dock Quong, born in 1901. Hu Shee died about 1911. Leong Shee took care of her grandchildren after her daughter died.

 
 

Photo of Jock Yat Kee
Photo of Jock Yat Kee,

 

 
Jock Yat Kee was about 60 years old in 1929. He emigrated to the United States in 1881. In 1898 he married Hu Shee at Placerville. This photo was attached to his 26 January 1929 birth affidavit for his son, Jock Dock Quong.

Can Ho (Howard Kan) – Gon Wing & Company business card

Photo of Can Ho
Can Ho Photo, Application for Reentry permit, Form 631, 1930, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle,  Can Ho (alias Howard Kan), Seattle Box 887, Case 7032/2456.
Business card for Gon Wing & Company
Gon Wing & Company business card, 1930, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Can Ho (alias Howard Kan), Seattle Box 887, Case 7032/2456.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 6 October 1930 Can Ho (alias Howard Kan), a merchant and member of Gon Wing & Company, 1307 First Avenue, Seattle, WA, filed an applicant for a re-entry permit, form 631. He was 52 years old and was born in Nam Tong Village, China. His parents were Sai Yick Kan and Leong Shee. He was married to Chun Shee who had died recently. He was originally admitted to the U.S. in 1907 and visited China in 1916, 1927 and 1930.
The Immigrant Inspector visited Gon Wing & Company and estimated the merchandise on hand was worth in excess of $3,000. He recommended that Can Ho’s application be approved.