Tag Archives: Chicago Illinois

Moy Gee Hung – Family photos – Boston, MA

Moy Gee Hung Group Photo
“Moy family photos,” ca. 1900,” Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, (Moy) Gee Hung case file, Seattle RS Box 62, RS 2478.

Photo Exhibit D & E – “taken in Boston” ca. 1900
Exhibit D – Moy Gee Pon (Henry), Moy Sam Sing holding Gee Hung, Moy Yut Gum (Annie)
Exhibit E – Moy Yut Gum (Annie), Moy Gee Hung, Moy Gee Pon (Henry)
In 1901 when he was five years old Moy Gee Hung, his parents, Moy Sam Sing and Kong Jung Chun, and his older sister, Annie, left Boston, Massachusetts and return to his parents’ home village at San How, Sun Ning District, China. His older brother Henry stayed in the U.S. with an uncle. His father didn’t stay in China long and returned to the U.S. to Portland, Oregon. His mother died in February 1906 and in 1909 Moy Gee Hung returned to the U.S. to join his father and brother in The Dalles, Oregon.
The interviews in the file focus on his father’s life. In the 1880s Moy Sam Sing was a merchant at Quong Sang Lung Company and San Sing Company in Boston, Massachusetts. He visited China, married Kong Jung Chun, and bought her back with him to Chicago. They had two children there, Annie Moy (born 1890) and Henry Moy (born 1893). After about five years in Chicago they moved to Washington, D. C. where according to Moy Gee Hung’s birth certificate in the file, he was born on 27 July 1894. Two years later they moved to Boston, Massachusetts.
Moy Sam Sing testified that when he originally came to the U.S. around the 1870s he lived in Portland, Oregon; St. Louis, Missouri; Chicago, Illinois; Providence, Rhode Island; returned to China (one year); Chicago, Boston, Atlanta, Georgia; Jacksonville, Florida; returned to China (about one year); returned with wife to Chicago (6 or 7 years), Washington, D.C. (one year), Boston, returned to China, traveled on East Coast for three months, Tacoma (3 years), Seattle (one year), Vancouver, Washington (one year); The Dalles, Oregon (3 years to 1909).
He applied for naturalization in Atlanta, Georgia (ca. 1883-84) and took out his second papers in Jacksonville, Florida. (ca. 1888). The interrogator asked if he knew at the time that naturalization of Mongolians was forbidden by law. Moy didn’t know but thought if the court was willing to issue the papers to him he would find two citizens to act as witnesses. With the help of Mr. Jones, a lawyer in Boston, Moy Sam Sing applied for and obtained his U.S. passport. He paid a $5 fee.
Much of the nine-page interview of Moy Sam Sing refers to events in his life which did not pertain to his son, Gee Hung. The interrogator was bringing up in great detail old, serious wrongs that Moy Sam Sing had allegedly committed but had not been proven. Moy offered to produce two consuls of China, Moy Back Hin of Portland and Goon Dip of Seattle as sponsors of his credibility.

When Moy Gee Hung arrived in Seattle In September 1909 he was joining his father and brother in The Dalles, Oregon. They were his witnesses. Neither had seen Moy Gee Hung in over ten years when he was five years old. His father, Moy Sam Sing, did not have a good reputation. He was well-known to Immigration Service for suspected perjury, smuggling and other unlawful schemes involving prostitution.
Moy Sam Sing didn’t really know his son very well but he had the proper paper work—a birth certificate, family photos, and the potential backing of two prominent Chinese citizens of Portland. According to the Portland Inspector J. H. Barbour, “I have minutely scrutinized with a magnifying glass exhibits D and E, [the photos] and have compared the alleged presentments thereon with the photograph affixed to Gee Hung’s present papers. I find a considerable resemblance between the two….”
Seid Back Jr., a well-known attorney from Portland, Oregon wrote to Immigration Service in Seattle to let them know that he was representing Moy Gee Hung upon his arrival in the U.S. in 1909.

After considering oral and documentary evidence, Moy Gee Hung was approved for admission to the United States as a native born citizen.
In 1919 Moy Gee Hung was applying to leave the United States for a visit to Canada and had no problem getting his application approved.

Han Chao-Tsung -Reentry Application

Han Chao-Tsung Box 962 7032 2342
Han Chao-Tsung Return Permit photo, 1933, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Han Chao-Tsung file, Seattle, Box 962, Case 7032/2342.

In June 1933 Han Chao-Tsung applied for a reentry permit so he could return to the United States after a one-year trip to China to visit family. He presented his Section 6 student exemption certificate issued to him in Manila, Philippine Islands in 1923. He was born on 6 June 1903 at Hwon Shui Village, Meng Tsing Honan, China and had lived in the United States continuously since his arrival in San Francisco on 11 September 1923 from Manila. He attended the University of Illinois from 1923 to 1927. In 1933 Han Chao-Tsung was working as a metallurgical research engineer for Illinois Steel Company in Chicago, Illinois.
Han Chao-Tsung was married to Elevina Pechon, a French woman, born in Lille, France. They were married on 10 April 1928 in Waukegan, Illinois and had a son, Pierre Han, born on 12 July 1929. The three of them were traveling together to China.

 

 

Hong Chow – 1918 Draft Registration Card

Hong Chow WWI Draft Card
Hong Chow, 1918 Draft Registration Certificate, 12 September 1918, Chinese Exclusion Act case files, RG 85, National Archives-Seattle, Box 438, Case 7030/873

 
Side A:
Hong Chow (Hong Chon Deow) P. M. G. O. Form No. 68, Registration Certificate
To whom it may concern, Greetings:
THESE PRESENTS ATTEST. That in accordance with the proclamation of the President of the United States, and in compliance with law, Hong Chow, 431 South Clark St., Chicago, Ill. has submitted himself to registration and has by me been duly registered this 12th day of Sept. 1918, under the supervision of the Local Board designated on the back hereof. [signed] O. C. Wells, Registrar
Side B:
Local Board Division No. 1, Room 122 county Bldg., Chicago, Illinois

Hong Chow’ file shows that he was born in San Francisco about 1874. His most recent entry to the U.S. was at the Port of Seattle on 17 October 1930 on the Princess Marguerite. He was living in Pocatello, Idaho at that time.